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Suppose you are a (patent) attorney in a pharmaceutical company and want to advise your company how to best protect the results of a clinical trial designed to find out the best possible treatment regimen of a certain known and approved drug X. The researchers of your company have devised and been allowed to conduct a clinical study in humans, involving a number of pretty different treatment regimens. The trial will be lengthy and quite costly; its result is not really predictable. In the end, your company’s trial will (hopefully) provide mankind with valuable new information how to best administer drug X. Your company’s management tells you that they need and, in their opinion, deserve patent protection for the new treatment regimen. What are your options and what are the potential pitfalls? Dr. Thorsten Bausch, European Patent Attorney and senior partner in our chemistry group, in his latest contribution on KluwerPatentBlog.

We hope that you enjoy reading it. In case of questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.